Stones speak to our Lesson for Palm Sunday


Chi RhoGenesis 2: 8 Plantaverat autem Dominus Deus paradisum voluptatis a principio in quo posuit hominem quem formaverat.

Genesis 2:8 Planted Kyrie God a paradise voluptuous at the beginning in which he posited the humans which he formed.”

Luke 23:43 Et dixit illi Jesus : Amen dico tibi : hodie mecum eris in paradiso.

Luke 23:43 And he said Jesus: Amen I tell you: today with me you will be in Paradise.

Arlington in springJesus tells the criminal hanging with him as he dies on the cross, “Today you will be with me in Paradise.” Paradise is a fancy Persian word meaning a garden. If you want to go to heaven, put down your harps and pick up your pick axes and shovels. When we get to heaven, it will be a paradise, a garden needing tending. A rule for writing is that one first tells the people what we are going to say, we say it, and then we say what we said. Good writers end their writing with the same images they started with. Our Bible starts and ends with a garden.

Our Gospel starts and ends with the same images. Our Gospels begin with John, “Produce good fruits as evidence of your repentance; and do not begin to say to yourselves, ‘We have Abraham as our father.’ I tell you, God can raise up children to Abraham from these stones. Even now, the ax lies at the root of the trees. Every tree that does not produce good fruit will be cut down and thrown into the fire.” Luke 3:8-9

fig“The devil told him, “If you are the Son of God, command this stone to become bread.” Jesus answered, “It is written, ‘One does not live by bread alone.” Jewish rhetoric, which Luke was aware, had a rule of rhetoric, “G’zerah Shavah.here the same word appears in two separate cases, it follows that the same considerations apply to both.”

The word stone applies to the Sons of Abraham, and it applies to the food Satan asks Jesus to eat. The point is about leadership, Satan asks Jesus to consume, live off the people. Jesus replies that we should live on the word, the bread of God alone.

We read in Luke 21, “While some people were speaking about how the temple was adorned with costly stones and votive offerings, he said, ‘All that you see here, the days come when there will not be left a stone upon another stone that will not be thrown down.” In John 2:20-21, Jesus equates himself with the temple a building of stone. Luke equates the stones of the temple with the people. Stone will not be left upon stone. There will no longer be a people where some get to the top on the bodies of those underneath them. All will be equal.

הר הזיתיםLuke 22:40-46 is interesting. In verse 40 Jesus says, “Pray you may not undergo the test.” In verse 46 it says, “Get up and pray that you may not undergo the test.” What is the test? Good writers end where they began, and here is that stone again, “withdrawing about a stone’s throw…” There is that stone again. The stone is the people Satan would have Jesus consume, the children of Abraham. The test is the temptation to think we are better than others.

The Hebrew word for evil is “Russia,” and it does not refer the country. It’s root is the same as “Rosh Hashanah,” or “First of the Year.” Evil is thinking of ourselves as first. “Stone appears in one other place in Luke. “They took the spices they had prepared and went to the tomb. They found the stone rolled away from the tomb.”

Our Gospels begin and end with a tree. The Hebrew word for tree and counselor is “Eights.” Our Gospel writers pun off “Eights,” often. The axe is set to the tree, and the ax is set to the counselors who think themselves first.

declaration-of-independenceThere no magic formulas in our Gospel about who should get what, only that we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal and endowed by their creator with unalienable rights, and that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness, and that governments are formed to protect those rights. Deuteronomy 30 tells us, “This command give you today is not too wondrous or remote for you. It is not in the heavens, that you should say, “Who will go up to the heavens to get it for us and tell us of it, that we may do it?” Nor is it across the sea, that you should say, “Who will cross the sea to get it for us and tell us of it, that we may do it?” No, it is something very near to you, in your mouth and in your heart, to do it.

Chi RhoEzekiel 36:26 brings us back to that stone, “I will take you away from among the nations, gather you from all the lands, and bring you back to your own soil. I will sprinkle clean water over you to make you clean; from all your impurities and from all your idols I will cleanse you. I will give you a new heart, and a new spirit I will put within you. I will remove the heart of stone from your flesh and give you a heart of flesh. I will put my spirit within you so that you walk in my statutes, observe my ordinances, and keep them.”

If we put aside our conceptions of other people and just look to see other human beings trying to get from conception to the grave in one piece, people who have done stupid things sometimes, but still people, the flesh of our hearts will tell us the proper formulas for promoting Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.

The Fifth Sunday of Lent, Lessons for all of Lent


MeanBefore discussing the Fifth Sunday of Lent, it is necessary to discuss some key mathematical terms. “Mean,” means average or common. Related, is “Mean,” which means a cruel person. The “Vulgate,” is the “Common” people’s Bible. From it, we derive our word, “Vulgar,” or course. “Koine,” means average. Mark 7:15 reads, “Nothing that enters one from outside can koine that person; the things that come out from within are what koine.” They make us common. In Mark 7, Jewish people, the chosen people, show they are special by refraining from eating certain foods.

The antonym for “Mean,” “Vulgar,” and “Koine,” in the Hebrew is Pharisee. They are the separate people, people who follow the dietary and etiquette rules designed to make one distinct. In each of our readings for Lent, we learn of how Jesus attacks this notion. In the First Sunday of Lent, we read of Jesus’ three temptations. In the first temptation we read, “The devil told him, “If you are the Son of God, command this stone to become bread.” Jesus answered him, “It is written, ‘One does not live on bread alone.”

PovertyThis is an allusion to the chapter before. “Do not begin to say to yourselves, ‘We have Abraham as our father,’ for I tell you, God can raise up children to Abraham from these stones. Jewish rhetoric, which Luke was aware, had a rule of rhetoric, “G’zerah Shavah, an analogy is made between two separate texts on the basis of a similar phrase, or word; where the same words are applied to two separate cases, it follows that the same considerations apply to both.

We again see the comparison of those who are above the rest, and the rest. Satan asks Jesus, “Turn these stones to bread.” Jesus hears, “Turn these children of Abraham into something to consume/live off of. Jesus did not come to be served but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many.” Matthew 20:28. The Pharisees consume the people with their rules. Jesus comes to serve, and he calls us to serve the least among us.

The Second Sunday of Lent has the transfiguration. The apostles stop comparing themselves with the riff raff around them. “Master, it is good that we are here; let us make three tents, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah.” While he was still speaking, a cloud came and cast a shadow over them. They became frightened when they entered the cloud. From the cloud came a voice, “This is my chosen Son; listen of him.”

See Peter’s reaction to the cloud. They stop comparing themselves with the riff raff and each other, and start comparing themselves with God. They find themselves unworthy of his presence. When we compare ourselves to others, we look good. When we compare ourselves to God, by being in his presence… that is another matter.

Be a RippleThe Gospel for the Third Sunday of Lent is Luke 13. Pilate mixing the blood of Jewish Martyrs with his sacrifices. The Pool of Siloam/Sent/Apostle also fell, killing 18. “18” appears twice in this chapter. In Hebrew, the numbers for “18,” also spell, “Life.” Our Gospel is about life. The message of the passage is clear. “Don’t point the finger that those who suffer. Don’t put yourselves over the less fortunate, or have less than you, or are in poverty, or you will be next.

God does feel free to give refresher courses. He rescued us from slavery in Egypt, the Irish potato famine, and the poverty of 19th Century Europe. He rescued us from the sweatshops of 19th and early 20th century America. He can deliver us back to oppression.

Our Gospel for the Fourth Sunday of Lent is that of the Prodigal/Unsaved/Unsafe Son. Jesus talks to the Separate Ones again, not the prodigal sons of the world. He speaks of penance, not for the prodigal sons, but for the elder sons, the Pharisees. To understand this passage we must understand the Ten Commandments as listed in Deuteronomy.

You shall not invoke the name of the NAME, your God, in vain/ לַ שָּׁוְא. Deuteronomy 5:11

You shall not bear dishonest/עֵד שָׁוְא witness against your neighbor. Deuteronomy 5:20

moonOne does not need to know Hebrew to recognize the similar shapes to the Hebrew in the two passages. The word for vain in Deuteronomy 5:11 is the word used for false or dishonest witness in Deuteronomy 20. This is important for reading the Prodigal son story. The elder son tells his father, “When your son returns who swallowed up your property with prostitutes, for him you slaughter the fattened calf.”

The elder son has no way of knowing how his brother spent the money. His charges could all be true, but that is irrelevant. The elder son violates the Eighth Commandment. He levels a charge when he has no way to know the truth. How is he different from those who think the poor are poor because of something they did, never investigating to learn the truth. The charge could be true. The Importance is in the younger son returning. Love dictates the elder brother take care of him. Not doing so is grounds for penance.

Those who argue from a communistic prospective need to read Luke 15 and the father’s words to his older son, “My son, you are here with me always; everything I have is yours…” If everything goes to the older son, the younger does not get another share of the estate. The father divided everything back in verse 12. Private property rules, but, and this is an important but, life and love rules private property. The father feels free to give the younger son what he has already given to the elder one, the fattened calf, the ring, the finest robe, and sandals.

The Fifth Sunday of Lent is the prodigal woman, the woman caught in adultery. Look for detail. “In Torah Moses commanded us to stone such women. So what do you say…?” “When they continued asking him, he straightened up and told them, “Let the one among you who is without error be the first to throw a stone at her.” He bent down again and wrote on the ground. They went away one by one, beginning with the elders.”

Thanksgiving“Beginning with the elders.” How do they know she is guilty of adultery?

“If a man is discovered lying with a woman who is married to another, they both shall die, the man who was lying with the woman as well as the woman.” Deuteronomy 22:22.

“The one among you who is without error be the first to throw a stone…” They know. They are the ones with whom she committed adultery.

The focus of this penance season is not on the poor and outcast among us, the vulgar people, the mean people, the average people. The focus for penance is on those who think they deserve what they have, for loyalty to the company, for hard work, for whatever they did in the past. The focus is on those who think the less fortune, in our nation and in the world do not have because they lack that loyalty, dedication, or hard work. We still need to work hard, for self, for family, for nation, but most importantly, in service of God.

The Prodigal Son, is he the older or younger son?


PovertyOur Gospel for this Fourth Sunday of Lent does not say anybody in the Prodigal Son’s family is aware of how he spent his money. Our translation describes his life as one of dissipation, a life squandered. We have our fundamentalist understanding to describe the literal translation. It is an “Unsaved life,” a life of doing what unsaved people do. He squandered his money. The other reading is that his life was not safe. He went from the security of home to the unsecured life of the big city and in the process lost his money.

Some might argue that our Greek recounting of the story is not original, that we should try to find the Hebrew and Aramaic to see which word or phrase Luke translates. If we assume he was bilingual, coming from the equivalent of the Yiddish quarter of Antioch, and translated to they best of his ability, the word or phrase he translated as “Unsaved,” was “Shallow Knee Samaria.” The rough translation of this is “Unguarded.” In support of this translation is that Shallow translates as, “Not,” and as, “Lax, at ease.” The prodigal son is at ease in his squandered life. More interesting is, “Knee Samaria,” which translates as guarding, as in, “Make a fence around Torah.” God makes a garden and commands Adam and Eve to guard it and to keep it. “Knee Samaria,” also translates as, “Sediment, lees.” As such, Jesus could have a pun on ,”Sediment/the pods on which the swine fed,” and this concept of guarding Torah, how the younger son lives his life.  The prodigal son lived an unguarded, unprotected life.

A Semitic reading of the text points out how the younger son leaves the protection of his Jewish homeland and goes to Gentile lands, a distant/non-Jewish land. The older son is then right in saying that the younger son did something wrong. He lived a Gentile lifestyle. The proof, our story later gives us, is that he lived with pigs, something Jews would never do, but Jesus never tells us how the elder son knows his brother lived with pigs.

Population fifths 2

“The elder son became angry, and when he refused to enter the house, his father came out and pleaded with him. He replied to his father, ‘When your son returns who swallowed up your property with prostitutes, for him you slaughter the fattened calf.”

Our passage only has the elder son mention prostitutes. To conjecture how he might know this, we make the same mistakes the Pharisees and grammarians do. In our Catholic Catechism we read, “2477 Respect for the reputation of persons forbids every attitude and word likely to cause them unjust injury.He becomes guilty: – of rash judgment who, even tacitly, assumes as true, without sufficient foundation, the moral fault of a neighbor; – of detraction who, without objectively valid reason, discloses another’s faults and failings to persons who did not know them.”

This is in reference to the Eighty Commandment again. Jesus intentionally uses a vague word to describe the sin of the younger son. The elder son assumes the younger hung around with prostitutes. When we assume the poor are poor among us are poor because of something they did, without investigating and finding “Sufficient foundation,” this violates the Eighty Commandment.

How did these people get in poverty? Were these all prodigal sons who went wild on their own, having nobody to blame but themselves? It does not matter.Is the younger son sincere in his repentance? The key line is, “Coming to his senses he thought, ‘How many of my father’s hired workers have more than enough food to eat, but here am I, dying from hunger.” Is his motivation, sincere repentance, or desire for food? Elizabeth Kuebler Ross gives this answer.  Grief has five stages, denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. Repentance is the acceptance stage. The younger son is getting ready to bargain, stage three. He is not at acceptance.

We need to listen to how the father responds to his son’s return. “While he was still a long way off, his father caught sight of him, and was filled with compassion. His father ordered his servants, ‘Bring the finest robe and put it on him; put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet.”

His father only cares about his return. For his response, read Isaiah, 65:24 “Before they call, I will answer; while they are yet speaking, I will hear.” Lamentations 5:21 is in the Amidah, the Jewish standing prayer Jesus complains about when he complains about the long rabbinic prayers. “Bring us back to you, the Name, that we may return.” Repentance is a two step process. The son comes home bargaining for food. The father responds in love. This brings love, and with this, repentance, after the party the elder son complains about.

Jesus criesThe address of this passage is to the elder sons, the Pharisees and the grammarians alive today, those who believe in the protestant work ethic. They are guilty of the idolatry of self. They worked hard all these years. They served God and the system and not once did they disobey orders. If we think we have what we have because we earned it, Jesus speaks to us.

Look where the younger son is at the start of the story. Look where the elder son is at the end of the story. Each is outside of the house. The party is in the house. When we exclude others, we are the outsiders, not they.

In Gospel reading for the Third Sunday of Lent we read how Jesus confronted the Separated Ones/Pharisees on the subject of the tower, which fell on those in Siloam and the blood Pilate mingled with his sacrifices. In that passage, Jesus tells us, “Those eighteen people who were killed when the tower at Siloam fell on them. Do you think they were guiltier than everyone else was who lived in Jerusalem? By no means! If you do not repent, you will all perish as they did!” Quit blaming those who suffer for their problems, or you will be next.

Wh0 is Israel? Israel, as Genesis 32:29 tells us, “Then the man said, “You shall no longer be named Jacob, but Israel, because you have struggled with divine and human beings and have prevailed.” Israel is not the older son, those who have never really struggled with life and with God. Israel is those who have suffered. Who is Jewish?  Genesis 29:35 “Once more she conceived and bore a son, and she said, “This time I will give thanks to the NAME,” therefore she named him Judah.” Judah means thanks. Those who are Jewish give thanks to God. They put God first, before all things, and credit God, not themselves for all they have. Jewish is not so much an ethnic group, as a way of thinking.

“One is not a Jew outwardly. True circumcision is not outward, in the flesh.v 29Rather, one is a Jew inwardly, and circumcision is of the heart, in the spirit, not the letter; his praise is not from human beings but from God.” Romans 2:28-29

AnnaLuke mentions 18 in chapter 13 twice. Why 18? Hebrew, Greek, and Latin, use letters for numbers. “18” in Hebrew is Chi, life. The father tells his older son, “My son, you are here with me always; everything I have is yours… Your brother was dead and has come to life again; he was lost and has been found.” Life is the issue here. Let us stop making excuses for allowing suffering in our world. Let us love God with all our hearts, all our animate being, and with all of our measure. Let us use all the tools at our disposal to end poverty in our nation and in our world.

Faith of Our Fathers and the Battle Hymn of the Republic for the Third Sunday of Lent


ambroseFaith of our fathers, living still In spite of dungeon, fire and sword, O how our hearts beat high with joy Whene’er we hear that glorious word!

Faith of our fathers! Holy faith! We will be true to thee till death!

Our fathers, chained in prisons dark, Were still in heart and conscience free; and blest would be their children’s fate, If they, like them should die for thee: Faith of our fathers! holy faith!
We will be true to thee till death!

 

Faith of our fathers, we will strive to win all nations unto thee; and through the truth that comes from God Mankind shall then indeed be free.

Faith of our fathers! Holy faith!
We will be true to thee till death!

Faith of our fathers, we will love both friend and foe in all our strife, and preach thee, too, as love knows how by kindly words and virtuous life.

Faith of our fathers! Holy faith!
We will be true to thee till death!

Pope Francis UNThese words by Doctor Frederick William Faber, D.D express the meaning for the readings of the Third Sunday of Lent. “Moses said to God, “But when I go to the Israelites and tell them, ‘The God of your fathers has sent me to you,’ if they ask me, ‘What is his name?’ what am I to tell them?” God replied, “I am who am.” Then he added, “This is what you shall tell the Israelites:
I AM sent me to you.” God spoke further to Moses, “Thus shall you tell the Israelites: The NAME, the God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, the God of Jacob,
has sent me to you. “This is my name forever; am I to be remembered through all generations.”

God is the one who is. In Greek thinking, all else is accidents, things which can or cannot be. That includes each of us. God is the God of Abraham/E Pluribus Unum, the God of Isaac/the ones who cry out, and the God of Jacob/those who follow behind. God is the God of our Fathers.

Statue of liberty lighning strikeOur fathers, chained in prisons dark, were still in heart and conscience free; and blest would be their children’s fate, If they, like them should die for thee.

The NAME said, “I have witnessed the affliction of my people in Egypt//Mitzraim/Oppression and have heard their cry of complaint against their slave drivers, so I know well what they are suffering. Therefore I have come down to rescue them from the hands of the Egyptians and lead them out of that land into a good and spacious land, a land flowing with milk and honey.”

A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name. Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand glows worldwide welcome; her mild eyes command the air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame. “Keep ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she with silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”

This is the faith of our Fathers, remembering the oppression of old, when we suffered the poverty and the civil wars of 19th Century Europe. God rescued us from over there to over here. We were chained in prisons dark.

ThanksgivingAll ate the same spiritual food, and all drank the same spiritual drink, they drank from a spiritual rock that followed them, and the rock was the Christ. God was not pleased with most of them, for they were struck down in the desert.

These things happened as examples for us, so that we might not desire evil things, as they did. Do not grumble as some of them did, and suffered death by the destroyer.

Faith of our fathers, we will strive to win all nations unto thee; and through the truth that comes from God Mankind shall then indeed be free.

He has sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat; He is sifting out the hearts of men before His judgment-seat; Oh, be swift, my soul, to answer Him! Be jubilant, my feet! Our God is marching on.

In the beauty of the lilies Christ was born across the sea, with a glory in His bosom that transfigures you and me. As He died to make men holy, let us die to make men free While God is marching on.

War horseThe words to our Battle hymn of the Republic, also written during the 19th Century echo the words for our readings for this Third Sunday of Lent. We remember the faith of our Fathers as they relate to dying and rising with Christ. Then, the Battle Hymn of the Republic. written for and about the Civil War, like “Faith of Our Fathers, “ commands us to be transfigured, to get out there and do something when we see suffering anywhere in the world, in particular in our back yard.

Faith of our fathers, we will love both friend and foe in all our strife, and preach thee, too, as love knows how by kindly words and virtuous life.

These things happened as examples for us, so that we might not desire evil things, as they did. Do not grumble as some of them did, and suffered death by the destroyer. These things happened to them as an example, and they have been written down as a warning to us, upon whom the end of the ages has come.

These things are an example for us. Instead of hating liberals or conservatives, democrats or republicans, let us strive to be one community, one nation, under God, with liberty and justice for all. That is not the filthy rich, blacks or whites, Hispanics or Native Americans, but for all people.

Some people told Jesus about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with the blood of their sacrifices. Jesus said to them in reply, “Do you think that because these Galileans suffered in this way they were greater sinners than all other Galileans? By no means! If you do not repent, you will all perish as they did! Or those eighteen people who were killed when the tower at Siloam/Sent Out fell on them. Do you think they were guiltier than everyone else who lived in Jerusalem/City of Peace? By no means! If you do not repent, you will all perish as they did!”

Why 18? Why not “Almost 20?” In Hebrew, letters and numbers use the same symbols. “Eighteen,” also spells “Life.” Our Gospel for this Sunday also tells us, “Do not point the finger at the other guy; strive to create a city of peace. It is for this that we are all Siloam/Apostolic from the Greek, sent out, to bring peace to our world. This is the message for the Third Sunday of Lent, and for our Songs for this day. Anything less is sin, and needs penance. Then again, this is Lent.

What is faith, or anything else is what the Demons do.


John the BaptistYou believe that God is one. (Deuteronomy 6:4-9 Mark 12:28-34) You do well. Even the demons believe that and tremble. Do you want proof, you ignoramus, that faith without works is useless? Was not Abraham our father justified by works when he offered his son Isaac upon the altar? You see that faith was active along with his works, and faith was completed by the works. Thus, the scripture was fulfilled that says, “Abraham believed God, and it was credited to him as righteousness,” and he was called “the friend of God.” James 2:19-23

Our first reading for the Second Sunday of Lent is that passage James refers to in his letter. James correctly points out that there is something more to faith than saying we have it, or we love Jesus, or we attend Mass every Sunday. Our Gospel notices the difference as well, as does our second reading.

Pope Francis UN“Faith,” comes from a Hebrew word, one we use every Sunday and close all of our prayers with. From the Latin, it simply means trust. It is not so in the Hebrew. The root word in Hebrew is, “Amen.” The root is “Emit.” The three radicals (in Hebrew, the letters are radicals) are “A,” “M,” and “T.” “A,” is the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet, “M,” the middle letter, and “T,” is the last letter. “A,” stands for leadership, “M,” for water, (as in Baptism,” and “T,” for the cross. These come from the shapes of the letters in that language.

Another way to present the idea is that when we have faith, we orient everything we have toward God. In our second reading, St. Paul notices this. “Many, as I have often told you and now tell you even in tears, conduct themselves as enemies of the cross of Christ. Their end is destruction. Their God is their stomach; their glory is in their “shame.” Their minds are occupied with earthly things.”

Be a RippleCompare this with Abraham who, like the Egyptian monks of two millennia ago, leaves all he has and strikes out into the desert. Compare this with the Egyptian slaves who head out into the desert and become the Hebrew nation. God becomes the beginning, the middle, and the end of their lives. This is faith.

We read in the Gospel for the Second Sunday of Lent, “As they were about to part from him, Peter said to Jesus, “Master, it is good that we are here; let us make three tents, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah.” He did not know what he was saying. While he was still speaking, a cloud came and cast a shadow over them, and they became frightened when they entered the cloud. Then from the cloud came a voice that said, “This is my chosen Son; listen of him.”

The allusion is to those Hebrew slaves in Exodus 19:16-18:

Seder plate smallOn the morning of the third day there were peals of thunder and lightning, and a heavy cloud over the mountain, and a very loud blast of the shofar,* so that all the people in the camp trembled. Moses led the people out of the camp to meet God, and they stationed themselves at the foot of the mountain. Mount Sinai was completely enveloped in smoke, because the NAME had come down upon it in fire. The smoke rose from it as though from a kiln, and the whole mountain trembled violently.

Exodus goes out of its way to show the trauma and the life changing aspects of the event. Luke does the same in the transfiguration. For the Hebrews, from then on, everything points to God. From now on, everything will point to Christ From now on, every action will be living in Christ, in present time. From now on, the goal in life will be living the commandments given on chapter later, for the Hebrews.

APTOPIX ICELAND VOLCANOOur commandments are not written on stone, or on paper. They are written on our hearts. In the original Greek, God says, “This is my beloved Son, listen of him.” That is, read of him and copy what he does, what he thinks, how he lives, and whom he loves. Doing this orients us for the present, and for the future.

When we live this new life, the cloud envelopes us. The Greeks called the perichoresis, or living in the cloud, which is God. It is the Divine Dance with God. It is all consuming. We need to notice the next event after the transfiguration we read about today, in each of the Gospels. It is Jesus healing the epileptic. To truly be spiritual is to act on the spirituality. It is going out to heal and transform the world. This is faith in Jesus Christ. Anything less is what the demons do.