Emerson teaches us the meaning of the Second Sunday of Ordinary Time


emersonHow we glow over these novels of passion, when the story is told with any spark of truth and nature! What fastens attention, in the intercourse of life, like any passage betraying affection between two parties? Perhaps we never saw them before, and never shall meet them again. We see them exchange a glance, or betray a deep emotion, and we are no longer strangers. We understand them and take the warmest interest in the development of the romance. All mankind love a lover. Emerson Essays: First Series (1841): Love

Judaism has a tradition of never saying the personal name of God. When the Bible mentions that name, the Jewish community generally replaces it with either “LORD,” or another title. The problem with this process is that “Lord,” also appears in the Bible resulting in the reader not knowing if “LORD,” refers to the personal name of God, or the title, “Lord.” This post uses, “NAME,” because it does not fit and therefore will flag you the reader that the reference is to the personal name of God. Our translations show this by capitalizing “LORD”, for God’s name and using “Lord,” for the title.

The First reading for the Second Sunday of Ordinary Time used in the Catholic liturgy tells us, The NAME has spoken who formed me as his servant from the womb, that Jacob may be brought back to him and Israel gathered to him; and I am made important in the sight of the NAME, and my God is now my strength! It is too little, the NAME says, for you to be my servant, to raise up the tribes of Jacob, and restore the survivors of Israel; I will make you a light to the nations that my salvation may reach to the ends of the earth. The Hebrew word for Salvation is Joshua, which translates into the Greek as Jesus.

Jess theses statement in Luke

Emerson was right. The whole world loves a lover. As Christians and as Catholics, we are supposed to be lovers.All too often, we find ourselves complaining that the world does not love us. Why? Do we always show the world Christ’s love which indwells within us?

This love is what is supposed to separate us as Catholics and as Christians from the radicalized Muslims, the fascists, the communists, and “the others.” In our Christian faith, we refer to S.P.I.C.E. Spiritually is the sharing of life between bride and groom through praying together and meditation. Christian love includes Physical closeness with plenty of hugs, kisses, holding hands, and snuggling. Agape also includes Intellectual stimulations, the need to bounce ideas off one another. We need to be Communicative/Creative, and to Express feelings, desires, and joke together. Our love is the spice of life. It is the love that allows Emerson to speak of how all the world loves a lover.

The key words are “Hitthkaddish,” and “Adore.” “The celebration of Mass… is found the high point both of the action by which God sanctifies (Hithkaddish) the world in Christ and of the worship or making worthy that the human race offers to the Father, adoring him through Christ, the Son of God, in the Holy Spirit,” according to the General Instruction of the Roman Missal.

spice

As presented in earlier posts, “Kiddushin,” refers to marriage language. “This is how the birth of Jesus Christ came about. When his mother Mary was Kiddushin to Joseph, but before they were Nassau, she was found with child through the Divine Breath.” We are sanctified when we act like we are in Kiddusin marriage, when we are still courting as we move to full marriage, when we work on S.P.I.C.E. or that Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual, Creative and Expressive side of our relationships.

The “Hith” prefix in the General Instruction of the Roman Missal denotes a Hitpaal construction. In this construction, verbs are in the active voice, intransitive. Most have a reflexive sense and are reciprocal.

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Bride and Groom, Blood of Christ for the Bride of Christ

We can hopefully start to see how sanctification, being sanctified, in the Hebrew, “Hitthkaddish,” and adoration are very much alike. Sanctification is not religious mumbo-jumbo. It is not just an outward sign, the visible pointing to a fuzzy invisible. It is action moving to contemplation, from this present world to heaven, that city yet to come. It is not people, who may or may not be like us, learning to live together. It is people, who may or may not be like us, coming to love one another because they adore the one true father who is the father to us all.

If this is a marriage, who is the mother. More importantly, who are the children? In our Catholic tradition, our mother is the Blessed Virgin. We learn from Revelation 12 who the children are.

The Sea Serpent became angry with the woman and went off to wage war against the rest of her offspring, those who keep God’s Mitzvah and bear witness to Jesus. Revelation 12:17

The woman is the Blessed Virgin. That is why Revelation 12:5 says, “She gave birth to a son, a male child, destined to rule all the nations with an iron rod.Her child was caught up to God and his throne.”  That is why Revelation 12:13 tells us, “When the dragon saw that it had been thrown down to the earth, it pursued the woman who had given birth to the male child.”

Dragon is Greek for a water serpent. Rome was considered to be a sea power in the first century. Mary was the person who gave birth to the male child, Jesus. Getting caught up to heaven refers to Jesus’ Passion and Ressurection.

Revelation 12:14 clearly refers to Joseph and Mary’s flight to Egypt. John of Revelation appeals to a tradition, based on Matthew, that Jesus, Mary, and Joseph stayed in Egypt for three and a half years.

If we are her children, the children of the Bride of Christ, we keep God’s Mitzvah and bear witness to Jesus.

God’s Mitzvah is that we love one another. John 13:34

This relationship is supposed to start in our liturgy. In the liturgy, there is a table with wine, a meal, flowers and generally incense. This is supposed to be a romantic dinner with the groom, Jesus, and the Bride of Christ, us. The readings are the Bride and Groom conversing, one with the other, as are the prayers. The Psalms are the songs the troubadours sing to the Bride and groom.

The liturgy, “through which the work of our redemption is accomplished,” most of all in the divine sacrifice of the Eucharist, is the outstanding means whereby the faithful may express in their lives, and manifest to others, the mystery of Christ and the real nature of the true Church.” That is liturgy’s purpose. We show love for each other, and through this love, God’s love for the world. How can we possibly love each other if we fail to help each other be all we can be. How can we love each other if we allow each other to go hungry, without adequate food, clothing, shelter, healthcare, education, or transportation? Emerson, unknowingly I am sure, gave us our simplest and yet surest test for knowing if we are doing God’s will. If we are going to be a light to the nations…

He begins, “All Mankind loves a lover.” Emerson’s essay then presents the demonstrations of complacency and kindness. Then he shows us his picture, first an immature schoolboy who teases the girls, and then the maturing boy who gives one he picks out as his favorite, flowers. He tells us that all the world loves the lover.

emerson

QUOTES FOR REFLECTION FOR THIS SECOND SUNDAY OF ORDINARY TIME

Through the church’s history and development of the theology of the Mass and scriptural interpretation, several academic works detail what is actually going on in the Mass.

Words of Institution 3Here are some of these.

The General Instruction of the Roman Missal Chapter 1 Section 16 tells us, In the celebration of Mass… is found the high point both of the action by which God sanctifies (Hithkaddish) the world in Christ and of the worship (Making worthy) that the human race offers to the Father. We adore him through Christ, the Son of God, in the Holy Spirit. In it, moreover, during the course of the year, the mysteries of redemption celebrated to be in some way made present. As to the other sacred actions and all the activities of the Christian life, these are bound up with it, flow from it, and are ordered to it.

The Mass dedicates us, brings us into a marital relationship with God and each other. We need to notice how what we do after Mass flows from what we do during Mass. They know we are Christians by our love for each other, for them, and the rest of humanity.

The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy tells us, The liturgy, “through which the work of our redemption is accomplished,” most of all in the divine sacrifice of the Eucharist, is the outstanding means whereby the faithful may express in their lives, and manifest to others, the mystery of Christ and the real nature of the true Church. It is of the essence of the Church that she be both human and divine, visible and yet invisibly equipped, eager to act and yet intent on contemplation, present in this world and yet not at home in it.

The Hebrew word for this redemption is Goel, Gill, as in my last name. In the Book of Ruth, Boaz is Ruth’s Goel. He marries her and in the process saves her. The liturgy does the same for us. Through the marriage feast which is the Mass, we express to the world that we are a loving community that invites everyone. As we go out into the world, we have the invisible Christ in us which we received in Communion. Communion brings a balance of contemplation and action.

According to the General Instruction of the Roman Missal, Chapter 5, Section Section 304, Out of reverence for the celebration of the memorial of the Lord and for the banquet in which the Body and Blood of the Lord are offered, there should be, on an altar where this is celebrated, at least one cloth, white in color, whose shape, size and decoration are in keeping with the altar’s structure.

This is how the birth of Jesus Christ came about. When his mother Mary was Kiddushin to Joseph, but before they were Nassau, she was found with child through the Divine Breath. Joseph her husband, since he was a Tsaddik, yet unwilling to expose her to shame, decided to divorce her quietly. Such was his intention when, behold, the Moloch of the NAME appeared to him in a dream, “Joseph, Ben David/Beloved, do not be afraid to take Mary your wife into your home. It is through the Divine Breath that this child has been conceived in her.”

Matthew 1: 18-20 is our Gospel lesson for the Second Sunday of Ordinary Time.Notice how Matthew presents her relationship with Joseph as being Kiddushin or Holy Marriage. He then tells us that it is through the Holy Spirit that Mary conceives Jesus. The Holy Spirit is the Kiddushin Spirit, a spirit that points to our being Mary’s children and siblings of the entire human race.

 

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